ALBUM REVIEW: Antisocialites – Alvvays

Three years have passed since Alvvays’ self-titled debut album. Laced with jangly guitars and youthful lyrics, it quickly became an essential in any real Indie music fan’s CD collection. Their latest release ‘Antisocialites’ manages to develop their dream-pop sound, with enhanced vocal melodies and near flawless song writing.

The first single, ‘In Undertow’, got fans more than excited with its alluring synthesiser intro and crisp sound production. Alec O’Hanley’s driving distorted guitar strums in the back as Molly Rankin’s witty lyrics speak of a failed relationship that’s come to it’s inevitable end. Contrasting to the love songs such as ‘Archie, Marry Me’ that filled up their first album. The second song on the list is ‘Dreams Tonight’, reverberating guitar effects and beautifully soft singing create a dreamy atmosphere, living up to the song’s title. The jangly guitar returns on ‘Plimsoll Punks’,  The Smiths and The Cranberries are evident in Hanley’s twangy tone and spiralling riffs.

Antisocialities is, without a doubt, an extremely strong entry into Alvvay’s expanding repertoire. A familiar Indie pop style with trendmoius ear-candy vocals, who could say no?

The boisterous “Lolli Pop (Ode to Jim)” is bathed in layered guitars and wonderful sound effects which blend well with Rankin’s angelically delicate vocals. The dream-gaze ambiance on “Already gone” takes the listener to one of the quieter moments on the album. Genuine sentiment and a chillingly subtle underlayer of scratching guitar strings creates an intriguing sound and welcome contrast on the album. “Saved by a Waif” is possibly my favourite tune on the record, its pounding drums and rock chords drive the song into an excellent chorus. Here we see a brilliant vocal interplay between Rankin and backing singer Kerri MacLellan. The final song, “Forget About Life” is reminiscent of their previous album’s final song “Red Planet”, using a stripped back instrumentation and slower rhythm. The line near the end of the song, “undrinkable wine” is certainly an opinion I share.

Antisocialities is, without a doubt, an extremely strong entry into Alvvay’s expanding repertoire. A familiar Indie pop style with trendmoius ear-candy vocals, who could say no?

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