Writer’s Note: Daisy’s Dead

‘I have become increasingly frustrated with plays that are controversial for the sake of being controversial’.

By seeing 70+ plays at the Edinburgh Fringe, I have become increasingly frustrated with plays that are controversial for the sake of being controversial. So many plays are written only with the mindset of ‘what can I write to be different?’ or ‘what’s in the news at the moment?’ without genuine connection to the subject.

With Daisy’s Dead, I wrote it purely for enjoyment.

I just want people to enjoy it, and I want people who wouldn’t typically watch theatre in Durham to go and enjoy it too. I have always loved directors such as Pearce and Tarantino, films such as Snatch and Filth and I wanted to capture their intense energy and put it on stage. As a genre typically dominated by men, I want to show that I can write like that too. Quick-fire dialogue, sudden shifts from funny to uncomfortable moments, swearing in every other line: this play is an experiment.

Set in the aftermath of a robbery gone wrong, Daisy’s Dead follows the negotiations between a hostage, Ben, and his stabbed captor, Jack, as neither of them can escape without the help of the other. It may seem like a standard hostage situation, but it’s not. I wanted to play with power dynamics, twist tradition on its head. What happens if the hostage has Asperger’s and doesn’t understand the danger of his situation? What happens when the captor has been stabbed by his own gang and can’t escape? What happens if a captor begins to lose control of his own hostage? Can he get it back?

I think that you should find out why ‘Daisy’ is relevant in a play of all boys. It’s all I’ve been asked. 

‘Daisy’s Dead‘ shall be performed on the 9th of February on Site-Specific Night, in the Horsfall Room, Chads. (7pm, 8:15pm, 9:20pm)

 

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